Causes of spotting before period

Causes of spotting before period

Spotting is minor vaginal bleeding that takes place between periods. Small amounts of blood are frequently involved with spotting.

10 Oct, 2022

Spotting is minor vaginal bleeding that takes place between periods. Small amounts of blood are frequently involved with spotting. After using the restroom, you can find it on the toilet paper or in your underpants. If you need protection, you often simply need a panty liner and not a pad or tampon. Abnormal vaginal bleeding, also known as intermenstrual bleeding, refers to bleeding that occurs outside of the menstrual cycle. It is caused by low progesterone. So many things causes spotting, we will be discussing some of the causes below

Ovulation

During your menstrual cycle, your body releases an egg, which ruptures the structure holding it and may result in pink or red spotting. Ovulation bleeding often only lasts one or two days and is extremely minimal.

Implantation bleeding

Implantation bleeding can happen 6 to 12 days after conception when a fertilized egg adheres to the uterine lining.

Spotting occurs together with implantation in one-third of pregnant women. A pregnancy test can identify an early pregnancy in a few weeks and is frequently accompanied by symptoms like breast tenderness, mood swings, or nausea.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a challenging pelvic condition in which tissue typically seen in the uterine lining is discovered elsewhere, such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or abdominal region. It results in moderate to severe cramps, heavy or irregular bleeding, and pelvic pain. Although endometriosis does not have a permanent cure, its symptoms can be managed with medication or surgery.

Stress

Know that being stressed mentally or physically may also be creating some hormonal changes that could lead to mid-cycle spotting if you notice it's hurting your food habits, sleep, and general well-being.

To make your mind healthy and happier, try to reduce your stressors or consult a mental health expert.

Birth control

Spotting is frequently brought on by the use of hormonal birth control, such as the pill, an implant, an injection, or an intrauterine device (IUD). Spotting usually stops with IUDs and the pill three to six months after starting. With sustained use, spotting from implants and injections may or may not get better.

In general, it's a good idea to see a doctor if your spotting is accompanied by pain of any type or if it lasts for more than a few months. Your doctor can assist you in looking at your lifestyle and medical background to determine what might be going on.