What are Uterine Fibroids and Are They Dangerous?

What are Uterine Fibroids and Are They Dangerous?

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that occur in the uterus. They can vary in size and can cause some mild to moderate problems, such as pain during sex or urination, heavy periods, and difficulty getting pregnant.

20 Sep, 2022

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that occur in the uterus. They can vary in size and can cause some mild to moderate problems, such as pain during sex or urination, heavy periods, and difficulty getting pregnant. However, uterine fibroids are generally not dangerous and can be treated with medication and surgery.

What are uterine fibroids and what are their symptoms?

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors of the uterus. They occur in up to 10% of women of reproductive age, and are the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. Uterine fibroids are not cancerous, and there is no clear cause for their development. However, they can cause significant menstrual symptoms, including cramps, bloating, and pain during intercourse. Uterine fibroids may also cause infertility if they grow large enough.

Some symptoms includes

  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Menstrual periods lasting more than a week
  • Pelvic pressure or pain
  • Frequent urination
  • Difficulty emptying the bladder
  • Constipation
  • Backache or leg pains

How are uterine fibroids diagnosed?

  • Uterine fibroids are benign tumors of the uterus. They can range in size from a few centimetres to several centimetres in diameter. They are more common in women than in men, and they are usually diagnosed during the reproductive years (between the ages of 25 and 45).
  • Oftentimes, uterine fibroids are discovered by chance during a normal pelvic check. Your uterus may have anomalies that your doctor may feel and that point to the presence of fibroids.

The following tests may be prescribed by your doctor if you exhibit uterine fibroids symptoms:

  • Ultrasound. Your doctor might request an ultrasound if further confirmation is required. In order to map and quantify fibroids as well as confirm the diagnosis, it uses sound waves to create a picture of your uterus.
  • To obtain photos of your uterus, a doctor or technician will either place the ultrasound transducer into your vagina or move it over your abdomen (transabdominal).
  • lab testing. Your doctor can prescribe additional testing if you experience unusual menstrual bleeding to look into possible causes. A complete blood count (CBC) may be among them too. A complete blood count (CBC) can help determine whether you have anemia from ongoing blood loss, and other blood tests can help rule out thyroid issues or bleeding disorders.

TREATMENT

  • Uterine fibroid can be treated through medication or surgery. Your doctor will tell you which way is best for you. Uterine fibroids can also cause infertility if they block the passage of the sperm. If you have uterine fibroids, it is important to see a doctor as soon as possible so that you can get a diagnosis and start treatment