Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a form of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that is much more severe. Women who are of childbearing age can be affected. It's a major medical issue that requires attention and care.

27 Jul, 2022

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a form of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that is much more severe. Women who are of childbearing age can be affected. It's a major medical issue that requires attention and care. Medication and alterations to one's lifestyle may occasionally be used to control symptoms.

The symptoms of PMDD appear a week before your period and go away a few days afterwards. Activities of daily living are hampered by the symptoms. At this time, PMDD symptoms are so severe that it is challenging for women to function at work, at home, and in interpersonal relationships. Pmdd can keep you from getting through the day.

Symptoms includes

• severe depression

• feeling of hopelessness

• anxiety and irritability

• crying spells

• cramps and muscle pain

• Fatigue

• Loss of interests in things that matters

• Change in appetite

Studies have linked PMDD to decreased levels of serotonin, a brain neurotransmitter that aids in nerve signal transmission. Serotonin is used by specific brain cells to regulate mood, focus, sleep, and pain. Serotonin levels may drop as a result of hormonal shifts, which could result in PMDD symptoms.

Your doctor will examine you physically and speak with you about your medical history. In order to assist your doctor in diagnosing PMDD, you must keep a calendar or diary of your symptoms. To be diagnosed with PMDD, you must exhibit five or more symptoms, including one symptom related to your mood.

TREATMENT

One or more of these therapies may be suggested by your doctor to help control PMDD:

strategies for reducing stress, such as meditation and deep breathing exercises.

dietary adjustments, such as reducing caffeine intake and foods that are high in fat, sugar, or salt.

birth control pill containing ethinyl estradiol and drospirenone.

Serotonin levels in your brain can be controlled using antidepressants.

Painkillers available over-the-counter to treat physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, migraines, and cramps (dysmenorrhea).

Regular exercise can elevate your mood.

strategies for reducing stress, such as meditation and deep breathing exercises.